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2017-2018 Continuing Education Courses

To register for classes, you have three options:

1. Register online and pay online with Paypal. 
2. Register online and send in a check.
3. You may download the course registration form and mail it in with a check.

May we ask that even if you download the form and mail it in that you take a few minutes to fill out the course registration so that we may update our digital records. Thank you.

Course Registration Form for download (pdf) and mail in

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Online Brochure For Courses 2017-2018 Download (pdf)

 

Courses for 2017-2018

In the Realm of Unrepresented states: Understanding the Patient who is Difficult to Reach

Contemporary Psychoanalytic Field Theory (postponed until next year)

Cultural Issues in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: Identification and Identity in Immigration 

Placing your Theory on the Couch: Models of Listening that Shape Therapist Inference

Clinical Assessment and Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Gender Nonconforming Children, Adolescents and Adults

Social neuroscience and psychoanalytic perspectives on parenting and addiction

Joyce's Ulysses and Psychoanalytic Listening

 

In the Realm of Unrepresented States: Understanding the Patient Who is Difficult to Reach

Instructors: Mary L. Ayre, M.D. and Angela Cappiello, M.D., Ph.D.

Educational Objectives:

¨  To study unrepresented states of mind, and non-neurotic aspects of the personality. 

¨  To explore concepts such as representation, symbolization, alpha-function, and mentalization. 

¨  To discuss how the intersubjective work between therapist and patient leads to a transformation of the unrepresented states into increasingly organized mental phenomena, amenable to more usual therapeutic interventions.

¨  To examine in the clinical material primitive, unrepresented states of the mind.

Audience: Mental Health Professionals, and Trainees.

In our work with patients we are often confronted with the issue of experience that cannot be expressed into words. “Unrepresented states’ define basic raw data, internal or external, which have failed to be transformed into symbols, or denote anxious states of impending danger, perceived as concrete objects in the psyche or as bodily states. Such unrepresented states can neither be used as food for thought nor stored as memories in the mind.

This course will discuss the intersubjective and intrapsychic work needed to transform and elaborate these unrepresented states into increasingly organized mental phenomena, amenable to more usual therapeutic interventions. Therapeutic action often consists of dreaming—that is, of undertaking the transformations of sensory storms into images that the patient cannot perform by himself.

Drawing from various authors (Levine, Bion, Botella & Botella, Ogden, Ferro etc.) this class will discuss ways to develop in the patient the capacity to generate images, to create dreams out of the forms of concrete thought represented by symptoms (Ogden, 2008)

Educational Objectives

1) This course will fill the educational gap by broadening current understanding of unrepresented states, and non-neurotic parts of the personality, and by providing in-depth analysis of individual cases.

2) The course will improve the professional/clinical competence of the participants by examining case studies in which is applied the intersubjective work needed to transform and elaborate the unrepresented states into increasingly organized mental phenomena, amenable to more usual therapeutic interventions.

3) The course design will include seminar discussion with readings and case material. We will consider aspects of unrepresented mental states and non-neurotic parts of patients’ personality. We will study concepts such as representation, symbolization, alpha-function, working through, and mentalization.

4) Taking the course the participants will improve clinical understanding and competence in the unrepresented states of mind, and non-neurotic parts of patients’ personality, in addition to enhancing the participants’ clinical and interpersonal skills, and quality of care. 

8 sessions 

Tuesdays, 6–8 pm

September 26 October 24 November 28 December 19 2017
January 23 February 20 March 20 April 24 2018

Dr. Cappiello’s office:

49 Welles Street, Suite 216

Glastonbury, CT

Fee: $ 640 ($ 50 for trainees)

 


Contemporary Psychoanalytic Field Theory (This course is postponed until next year)

Instructor: S. Montana Katz

Educational Objectives:

¨  To be able to describe the theory of psychoanalytic field theory

¨  To be able to describe the clinical techniques of psychoanalytic field theory

¨  To be able to apply the techniques of psychoanalytic field theory in clinical practice

Audience: mental health professionals and trainees ,clinicians, scholars, and others interested in the topic

This course will cover contemporary psychoanalytic field theory models and clinical techniques.  Specific emphasis will be placed on the role and activity of the analyst and on analytic listening.  The application of fundamental concepts and techniques of field theory will be discussed, such as the use of the analytic field and the analytic relationship, unconscious metaphoric processes, and reverie.  Readings for the course will be drawn from the work of Madeleine and Willy Baranger, Giuseppe Civitarese, Roosevelt Cassorla, Antonino Ferro, Edgar Levenson, and other contemporary field theorists. 

4 Sessions

Wednesdays 7-8:30

March 7,14,21,28 2018  

255 Bradley Street, New Haven [or specify other location]

Fee $240

 

Cultural Issues in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: Identification and Identity in Immigration 

Instructor: Esperanza Díaz MD

Educational Objectives:

¨      To understand the developmental tasks of pre-adolescence, adolescence, and adulthood in identity formation in preparation to understand the immigrant experience.

¨      To understand the psychological process of immigration and the subsequent reorganization of identity.

¨      To appreciate the impact of culture and language on identity.  

Audience: Mental health professionals, clinicians, scholars and trainees interested in psychotherapy and mental health services to immigrants and minorities.  

Starting with the seminal paper of the “First Not Me Possession” by Winnicott, the course will review the developmental tasks of preadolescence, adolescence and adulthood to prepare the participant to understand the process of an immigrant in a new culture and new language. We will review papers by Anna Freud and Sigmund Freud. Then, we will review the “Second Individuation Process of Adolescence” (Blos), “The Waning of the Oedipus Complex” (Loewald) and the “Conflicts of Aggression in Coming of Age” by our own Samuel Ritvo with his 2003 paper. We will end by reviewing what happens to identity and individuation in immigrants and the impact of language and cultural differences in establishing a new identity. Participants will have the opportunity to bring examples of their own cases to illustrate the discussions.

4 sessions

Tuesdays, 5:30–7pm

November 14, 21, 28 and Dec 5. [Monday evenings would be a second option.]

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 240

 

Placing your Theory on the Couch: Models of Listening that Shape Therapist Inference

Instructor: Ira Moses, Ph.D.

Educational Objectives: 

¨ By more detailed listening participants will be able to help their patients articulate their experiences more fully

¨ Participants will be able to differentiate the distinct treatment implications of the Relational and Interpersonal Models.

¨ Reviewing published transcripts will enhance the participants ability to assess the therapist’s responsiveness to the patient’s reports.

Audience: Mental health clinicians, trainees, and others interested in the topic 

     This seminar will critique how our ways of listening to the material shape our inferential process.  By reviewing the details of published psychoanalytic transcripts we will review the many points in the treatment where the clinician may opt to intervene (or not) depending on one's model of treatment.   In examining the transcripts questions will be debated about the "when" and "how" of addressing the patient's, characterological patterns, acting out, transference, or the real relationship. We will review how the patient responds to the analyst's  interventions and how we can think about working with the  "here and now," and/or the "there and then" of the material. Particular attention will be paid to some critical distinctions between Interpersonal and Relational clinical theory which differ significantly in in their view of mental functioning and clinical interventions

4 Sessions

Wednesdays, 630-8 PM

Oct 4,11,18,25 2017

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee:  $240


Clinical Assessment and Psychotherapeutic Treatment of Gender Nonconforming Children, Adolescents and Adults

Instructors: Lisa Marcus, PhD and Ken Marcus, MD

Educational Objectives: 

¨      To broaden our ability to help individuals and their families as they make gender transition decisions given the limitations in what we know about causal mechanisms, developmental trajectories and treatment outcomes.

¨      To better help patients to evaluate and address intrapsychic conflicts, conscious and unconscious, related to gender identity, as well as the interpersonal difficulties created by familial and cultural pressures toward gender conformity, as they work toward greater authenticity and comfort within their gender identities.

¨      To better help family members to address the internal struggles, as well as interpersonal challenges, that arise when a family member is redefining their gender identity.

Audience: Mental health professionals and trainees who have some clinical experience working with gender nonconforming individuals, whether in clinical or support agency settings.

We will focus on participants’ clinical work with gender nonconforming individuals. Clinical issues will include, but not be limited to: how to evaluate and understand gender identity – how developmental level, character traits, concurrent psychopathology, and familial and social environmental factors affect this assessment; how to advise individuals and families who are considering potentially irreversible medical intervention while recognizing the inherently elusive and changing nature of identity; how to recognize when psychotherapy is indicated in the course of a gender consultation. 

8 sessions

Mondays, 7–9 pm

Sept 18, 25, Oct 2, 16, 23, 30, Nov 6, 13, 2017

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 640 

 

Social neuroscience and psychoanalytic perspectives on parenting and addiction

Instructors: Linda Mayes and Helena Rutherford

Educational Objectives: 

¨      Understand the value of examining parenting and addiction from neuroscientific and psychoanalytic perspectives

¨      Critical consideration of the experimental and theoretical research that has been introduced to date in this area and its relevance for interventions

Audience: (eg mental health professionals and trainees ,clinicians, scholars, and others interested in the topic) Any and all – attendees do not need any prior knowledge of neuroscience (or psychoanalysis)

The purpose of this course is to outline the relevant neuroscientific and psychoanalytic literature as it pertains to parenting and addiction; specifically, these sessions will serve to (1) demonstrate the value of these disciplines to our understanding of parental addiction and the impact of addiction on the emerging family system; and (2) support the identification of mechanisms that can be directly targeted by intervention approaches.  

6 sessions

Day of the week, time, dates [give us your preferences; we will try to accommodate you]

Beginning at 5pm or 5.30pm would be optimal; day of the week is flexible, spring semester

255 Bradley Street, New Haven 


Fee: $ 240

 

 

Joyce's Ulysses and Psychoanalytic Listening

Instructor: Paul Schwaber, PhD

Educational Objectives:

¨  To read through and comprehend and enjoy Ulysses.

¨  To consider the usefulness of a psychoanalytic consideration of the characters.

¨  To consider the psychodynamics of the changing narrative strategies.

Audience:  clinicians, scholars, and students of literature interested in the topic.

James Joyce's Ulysses has often been acclaimed as the greatest novel of the twentieth century. Our aim will be to read this remarkable novel closely and to appreciate its comedy, insight, and creative force. In doing so, we will consider its contemporaneity with Freud's work, the way a pyshcoanalytic perspective helps to illuminate it, and how Ulysses in turn tests psychoanalysis.

14 sessions

Thursdays, 7–9:00 pm

February 22 2018
March 1,8,15,22,29
April 5,12,19,26
May 3,10,17,24

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 640 ($ 50 for trainees)