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Continuing Education Courses Archived

Home > Education and Training > Continuing Education Courses > 2010-2013 Courses

 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 2016-2017

New Models of Bereavement Theory & Treatment: New Mourning

Instructor: George Hagman, LCSW

Educational Objectives:

¨      Participants will acquire extensive knowledge of new psychological models of bereavement, mourning and grief

¨      Participants will learn to apply this knowledge to perform more accurate and effective assessments of patients who have experienced bereavements

¨      Participants will gain skill in developing more reliable and useful treatment plans which target the unique responses of their bereaved patients

Audience: clinicians, students, and interested scholars

This course reviews the psychoanalytic theory of mourning and loss, and offers a new perspective based on contemporary analytic and extra-analytic theory and research. The classical emphases on decathexis as the major work of mourning is critiqued and a new model based on continuity, dialogue and meaning is offered. Extensive clinical discussion regarding work with grieving or traumatized patients is encouraged. Participants will gain a thorough knowledge of the theory of mourning and loss, and acquire greater skill in working with these patients. Mourning, loss and transition as universal as well as highly personal processes are emphasized.

4 sessions

Tuesdays, 7–9 pm

January 31, February 7, 14, 21, 2017

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 320 ($50 for trainees)

 

Psychoanalysis and Its Critics: Understanding the Arguments

Instructors: Ken Marcus, MD and Lisa Marcus, PhD

Educational Objectives:

¨  To become familiar with the most salient current criticisms of psychoanalysis as well as the responses to those critiques

¨  To develop an understanding of the epistemic underpinnings, scientific methodologies and validity of the conclusions drawn by both critics and adherents

¨  To apply and integrate these analyses into their own clinical work and/or their broader view of the psychoanalytic enterprise

Audience: Clinicians, scholars, and trainees

This course is the first in a series intended to explore the current status of psychoanalysis as a theory of mind, a clinical theory, a treatment, and in its relationship to related clinical, bio-medical and psychosocial sciences. Psycho-analysis, whose ideas have been both revolutionary and controversial since its inception, has been challenged from an array of perspectives—philosophic, scientific, clinical and organizational. It has seen its status and credibility as the primary explanatory model of human mental functioning—of what it means to be human—decline in relation to other explanatory systems originating from within and without psychoanalysis and the psychological sciences. For those with a deep conviction that psychoanalysis has yielded fundamental insights concerning the human condition which could not have been uncovered in any other way and who thus wish to preserve it, it is essential to understand the nature and quality of those criticisms and the nature and quality of psychoanalysis’ response.

6 sessions

Mondays, 7–9 pm

March 27, April 3, 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2017

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 480 ($ 50 for trainees)

 

Psychotic States of Mind

Instructor:  Robin J Renders, PhD

Educational Objectives:

¨      To identify the underlying psychological functions of essential psychotic mental processes

¨      To identify the concepts of mental states that manifest on a continuum of different levels of psychological organization

¨      To apply the theoretical understanding of psychotic mental processes to issues of technique

Audience: Clinicians interested in joining an ongoing study group led by the instructor in Stockbridge, MA.

This course will address psychotic processes as they are manifest in primary psychotic conditions (i.e., schizophrenia, paranoia) as well as other personality organizations.  We will consider Freud's original notion of "internal catastrophe" and focus on the relation between psychic reality and external reality along with concepts of the self, disintegration, impingement, and projective identification, and the significance of the context of object relations. Theoretical understanding will be linked to issues of technique, for example, the fear of being taken over.  Readings will be drawn from classical, developmental, and British object relations literature, including Segal, Bion, Rosenfeld, Winnicott, Fonagy and Target, and others. 

8 sessions

Wednesdays, 6:30–8 pm

April 12, 19, 26, May 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 2017

Stockbridge, MA

Fee: $ 360 ($50 for trainees)

Please contact Dr. Renders at 413-298-3920 or RobinRenders@aol.com if you are interested in this class.

 

Field Theory in the Consulting Room:  The Work of Antonino Ferro

Instructors: Angela Cappiello, MD, PhD, and Elizabeth Wilson, MD

Educational Objectives:

¨  To study the analytic field theory

¨  To explore the technical implications of the field theory in the here and now of the therapeutic relationship

¨  To examine clinical material following the analytic field model

Audience: mental health professionals and trainees

 

“The analytic field is made of all the lines of force, proto-aggregates of proto-emotions, proto-characters and characters floating in the virtual space of the field, as they gradually assume weight, color and three-dimensionality… It includes unconscious or unmentalized types of functioning, which are continuously transformed into thinkable forms...” (Antonino Ferro, 2002)

This course will explore Ferro’s model of analytic field. We will address the implications of the field model in terms of the therapist’s listening to the patient communications, transference-countertransference, reverie, and projective identification. We will read papers mainly from Ferro, Civitarese, Bion, and Baranger. We will examine case material in which the field theory is applied.

5 sessions

Thursdays 7–8:30 pm

May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 2017

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 300 ($ 50 for trainees)

   

Loewald & Beyond: The Mind, Representation & the Analytic Field

Instructor: Elizabeth A. Brett, PhD

Educational Objectives:

¨  Participants will learn about new concepts of the analytic field and of unrepresented psychic content

¨  Participants will learn how to recognize represented and unrepresented material in the field

¨  Participants will learn how to work clinically with poorly organized and unrepresented states

Audience: Mental health professionals, trainees and scholars

In his later work, Hans Loewald focused on psychic structure formation in the analytic field and on its development in undifferentiated and more complexly organized interaction. His ideas anticipated much of the contemporary concern with primitively organized/poorly represented experience and its treatment. In this elective, we will compare Loewald’s late contributions with recent views of the analytic field (Antonino Ferro and Giuseppe Civitarese) and unrepresented states (Howard Levine, Gail Reed, and Dominique Scarfone). 

6 sessions

Tuesdays, 6:30–8:30 pm

January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 480 ($50 for trainees)

CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES 2013-2014

Philosophical Problems in Psychoanalysis (CANCELLED)

Working with Adolescents: Clinical Applications of Developmental Psychoanalytic Theory

Primitive Dimensions of Countertransference States

Enhancing Your Clinical Skills with Self Psychology: An Introduction to the Theory and Clinical Methods

Resilience to Stress and Trauma (Postponed until the fall)

Using our Minds: Therapists' In-Session Links to the Patient (Postponed until next year)

Contemporary Psychoanalytic Approaches to Borderline Personality

Feminism, Film and the Mind

Philosophical Problems in Psychoanalysis (CANCELLED)

Instructor: Marshal Mandelkern, M.D., Ph.D.

Educational Objectives: To examine several philosophical problems raised by psychoanalytic theory and practice.

Audience: Practitioners of analytic therapy with an interest in philosophical questions, and those with an interest in psychoanalytic theory.

Course Description: We will look at several philosophical questions raised by psychoanalytic theory and practice: the scientific basis of analysis and the possibility of the hermeneutic alternative, the problem of free will in analysis, and the problem of consciousness. My main goal will be to highlight the problematic nature of these issues, rather than to come to any specific conclusion.

4 sessions
Saturdays, 10:30am- 12pm
October 5, 12, 19, 26
255 Bradley Street
New Haven, CT
Fee: $210 ($50 for trainees)

Working with Adolescents: Clinical Applications of Developmental Psychoanalytic Theory

Instructor: Norka T. Malberg, PsyD, LPC

Educational Objectives:

1) To discuss the application of the developmental psychoanalytic framework to the clinical work with adolescents.
2) To provide a clear conceptual framework to participants from which to develop clinical formulations.
3) To explore and compare classical and contemporary clinical modalities in adolescent psychodynamic psychotherapy.

Audience: Mental health professionals working with adolescents

Course Description: This course will review the clinical applications of the developmental psychoanalytic lens to the work with adolescents. Participants will be assigned readings offering a framework from which to think and discuss published clinical material. Strong emphasis will be placed on the importance of creating a clear clinical formulation that guides the process of intervention and informs the clinician's technical choices. Technical issues specific to contemporary work with adolescents such as the impact of social media will be discussed.

6 Sessions
Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm
September 17, 24
October 1,8,15
255 Bradley Street
New Haven, CT
Fee: $315 ($50 for trainees)

Primitive Dimensions of Countertransference States

Instructors: Mary L. Ayre, M.D. and Angela Cappiello, M.D., Ph. D.

Educational Objectives:
1) To develop awareness of countertransference states particularly in terms of intrapsychic and bodily experience.
2) To explore the current theoretical understanding of countertransference and its application in clinical settings.
3) To study clinical process material from current psychotherapy sessions to be presented by course members.

Audience: Mental health professional and trainees

Course Description: The analysis of countertransference states can lead us to understand the primitive dimensions of the mind of an individual. A therapist's somatopsychic experience in the room develops in parallel to the psychic shifts in the patient, and may provide valuable information in the clinical setting. We will explore the current literature regarding countertransference as a registration of something within the patient's unconscious that is not accessed verbally but is registered through the therapist's somatic/mind state.

5 sessions
Tuesdays 6:30pm-8pm
September 24
October 1, 8
November 5
49 Welles Street, Suite 216
Glastonbury, CT
Fee: $260 ($50)

Enhancing Your Clinical Skills with Self Psychology: An Introduction to the Theory and Clinical Methods

Instructor: George Hagman, LCSW

Educational Objectives:
1) Learn about the history, central theories and clinical concepts of Self Psychology.
2) Appreciate the importance of self-experience in psychological life and how it is tied to relationships with important others considered self objects.
3) Explore the central role of empathy in clinical treatment.
4) Increase awareness of the forward edge of development, and how clinicians can support these positive strivings while working through resistance to change.

Audience: Mental health professional and trainees

Course Description: This course will introduce participants to the basic theories and clinical applications of Self Psychology. Special attention will be given to those aspects of the field which are especially useful in clinical practice. Several classes will focus on special clinical challenges such as trauma, couples therapy and addiction. In depth case discussion will be used throughout. The goal of the class is for the participant to enhance his or her clinical practice with the help of Self Psychological understanding and techniques.

6 sessions
Tuesdays, 6-8pm
February 25, March 4, 11, 18,25, April 1 2014
255 Bradley Street
New Haven CT

Fee: $420 ($50 for trainees)

Resilence to Stress and Trauma

Instructors: Linda Mayes, M.D. and Steven Southwick, M.D.

Educational Objectives:
1) Students will learn about psychological, social and neurobiological factors associated with resilience to stress.
2) Students will learn about psychodynamic approaches to understanding resilience to stress
3) Students will learn about a variety of approaches to enhancing resilence.

Audience: Clinicians and interested members of the community.

Course Description: This class will focus on resilience to stress and trauma. Resilience will be discussed from neurobiological, psychological and social perspectives. How do mental health professionals and psychoanalysts think about trauma-related adaptation, defense mechanisms, reframing, recovery, resilience and posttraumatic growth?

4 sessions
Wednesdays, 5-6:30pm
March 5,12,19,26 2014
255 Bradley Street, New Haven, CT
Fee: $210 ($50 for trainees)

Feminism, Film and the Mind

Instructors: Millicent Marcus, Ph.D. and Victoria Morrow, M.D.

Educational Objectives:

1) To explore the intersection between feminist theory and film theory.

2) To become familiar with the theories of film critic Laura Malvey.

3) To understand the Freudian and Lacanian underpinnings of Malvey’s theories.

Audience: Those interested in feminism, psychoanalysis and expressions of these theories in film.

Course Description: This will be a one session presentation on psychoanalysis and feminist film theory. We will discuss the work of pioneering feminist film critic Laura Malvey (whose writing is heavily inflected by Freudian and Lacanian thought), and apply it to several sequences in Italian film.

One session
Thursday May 6, 2014, 7–9 pm
location TBA

Fee: $70 ($50 for trainees)

Using our Minds: Therapists' In-Session Links to the Patient (postponed until next year)

Instructors: Deborah Fried, M.D. and Brian Tobin M.D.

Educational Objectives:

1) To recognize the importance of events (seemingly stray thoughts, moods, memories, etc) in the therapist’s mind during sessions.
2) To appreciate how such stirrings reflect the patient’s affects, ideas, temperament and relationship patterns.
3) To use this understanding of our own and our patients’ states of mind to further the treatment.

Audience: Clinicians and trainees interested in the dynamics between patient and therapist.

Course Description: When attempting to understand patients one of our most powerful tools is our awareness of something going on in our minds, our experience in as well as between sessions. An idea that evolved from W. Bion is that these impressions may be in fact a form of communication from patient to therapist informing us about aspects of his or her intrapsychic organization. Given this notion, we work to link the experiences of something going on in the room to the patient’s psyche. Each week we will review a relevant article. Then, a member of our group will provide process material that focuses on the actual lived emotional experience of the therapeutic dyad in an effort for us to elaborate upon and jointly experience the theoretical ideas we are learning.

6 sessions
Thursdays, 6–7:30 pm
April 10, 17, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014
255 Bradley Street, New Haven
Fee: $315 ($50 for trainees)

Contemporary Psychoanalytic Approaches to Borderline Personality

Instructor: Stephen Atkins, M.D., Ph.D.

Educational Objectives: Upon completion of this course participants should be able to:

1) Understand the theories of borderline personality disorder underlying these approaches.

2) Understand how transference is used in these approaches.

3) Understand the role of interpretation in these approaches.

Audience: Mental health trainees or professionals with an interest in borderline personality disorder

Course Description: Two contemporary psychoanalytic approaches to the treatment of borderline personality disorder are Transference-focused Psychotherapy, developed by Otto Kernberg, John Clarkin, and Frank Yeomans; and Mentalization-based Psychotherapy, developed by Peter Fonagy and Anthony Bateman. We will explore the theoretical foundations and treatment techniques of these two approaches.

5 sessions
Wednesdays, 7–8:30 pm
April 16, 30, May 14, 28, and June 4, 2014
255 Bradley Street, New Haven
Fee: $260 ($50 for trainees)

Continuing Education Courses 2011-2012

 

 

A variety of individual courses are offered each year taught by members of the Western New England Psychoanalytic Society. Participants include mental health professionals and trainees, as well as others from outside the mental health field, at various levels of knowledge of psychoanalytic concepts. A course can serve as an introduction to psychoanalytic concepts or a way to deepen one's psychoanalytic understanding. Course topics have included theory and technique, developmental considerations, and studies of imaginative literature.

 

Courses for 2011-2012


Clinical Applications of French Psychoanalytic Theory

Psychosomatics and Contemporary Psychoanalysis

On Another Level

Philosphical Problems in Psychoanalysis

Anna Freud & The Developmental Tradition Today

Sex Therapy & Psychoanalysis: Strange Bedfellows or Complementary Companions?

Psychoanalysis Playful and Profound, Part I: The Works of Bertram Lewin

Law and Psychoanalysis

Moments of Conflict

 


 

Program Committee


Co-Chairs
Deborah Fried, M.D.
Rachel Bergeron, Ph.D.,J.D.

Robert White, M.D.
Coordinator, Seminars in Psychotherapy


Committee Members
Susan Bers, Ph.D.
Sybil Houlding, M.S.W
Angelica Kaner, Ph.D.
Fred Koerner, Ph.D.
Nancy Olson, M.D.
Lynn Reiser, M.D.
Bronce Rice, Psy.D.

 

Faculty 2011-2012

David Carlson, M.D.
Anne Dailey, J.D.
Carole Goldberg, Psy.D.
Frank Knoblaugh, M.D.
Lawrence Levenson, M.D.
Norka Malberg, Psy.D.
Marshal Mandelkern, M.D., Ph.D.
Jack Miller, M.D.

 

Accreditation

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the The American Psychoanalytic Association and the Western New England Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accrediated by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this live activity for a maximum of (number of credits) AMA PRA in Category 1 credit(s). Physician should claim only the credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Important Disclosure Information for All Learners:
None of the planners and presenters of the CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

CEU credit issued by N.A.S.W.-CT for hours attended under the continuing education criteria for Social Work Licensure renewal.

 

2010-2011 Continuing Education Courses

 

 

 

 

Courses for 2010-2011

 

The Role of Mourning in Psychoanalysis and Analytic Psychotherapy
Mentalization Based Interventions: Theory and Clinical Practice
Three Ways of Thinking about Thinking Contemporary Views of Trauma: Implications for Psychotherapeutic Practice
Philosophical Problems in Psychoanalysis Psychotherapy Supervision (Course to be held 2011-2012)
Writing from Inside-Out An Introduction to the Work of Anna Freud

 

The Role of Mourning in Psychoanalysis and Analytic Psychotherapy

Instructor: Sybil Houlding, MSW

Educational Objectives: (1) Participants will study significant papers in the analytic literature on mourning, (2) will become familiar with theories about the psychic work involved in mourning and (3) will become attuned to failed or pathological mourning in the clinical situation.

Audience: Mental health professionals; interested others.

Course Description: Mourning builds psychic structure and will be an essential part of any psychoanalysis or dynamic therapy. In this course we will read papers by Freud, Klein, and Loewald, as well as contemporary writers (Sodres, Steiner, Frankiel). We will view a film, Sand we are reading about.


6 sessions

Thursdays, 7–8:30 pm

September 23, 30
October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2010


255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $ 270.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mentalization Based Interventions:
Theory and Clinical Practice

Instructors: Norka T. Malberg, PsyD and Linda Mayes, MD

Educational Objectives: To study the theoretical basis and clinical applications of mentalization based interventions.

 


Audience: Mental health professionals and trainees, especially those working in community based settings.

 

Course Description: We will explore the theory of mentalization and the existing evidence that helped influence its clinical applications. All sessions will seek to illustrate the diverse clinical applications of the mentalization based intervention by
providing clinical examples and descriptions of existing interventions (such as group work with certain populations). Specific technical considerations and
guidelines will be discussed and illustrated.

 


5 sessions
Tuesdays, 5:30–7 pm

 


October 19, 26
November 2,9,16, 2010

255 Bradley Street, New Haven


Fee: $225

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Ways of Thinking about Thinking

Instructor: Frank W. Knoblauch, MD


Educational Objectives: To consider how observing and describing clinical material from different theoretical points of view affects our understanding of what the “data” are. To introduce approaches to clinical observation based on ideas from various psychoanalytic schools but also from non-psychoanalytic but related fields such as linguistics, semiotics, and neuroscience To learn about the theory of projective identification and some of its manifestations in an interaction between a therapist and a patient Audience: Mental health professionals and trainees (maximum 8)

 

Course Description: We will examine in detail and from several perspectives a 45-minute video recording and transcription of a psychotherapy session. In the first meeting we will read a chapter from John Muller’s (2000) book, Peirce, Semiotics, and Psychoanalysis and will consider the interview in terms of its “signs” and sign systems. We will go on to read some selections from Gerald Edelman’s (1989) book, The Remembered Present (a modern neuroscientific discussion of memory) to help us rethink the interview as it reveals the functioning of the participants’
“memories.” In our final meeting we will read some selections on projective identification from W.R. Bion and Thomas Ogden and relook at the interview with respect to how the two participants seem to
be affecting each other.

Three evening sessions
2 hours each
Dr. Knoblauch’s office in West Hartford.


Fee: $180


Contemporary Views of Trauma:
Implications for Psychotherapeutic Practice

Instructor: Steven Marans, PhD

Educational Objectives: This brief course will provide an overview of a psychodynamic context for understanding the phenomena of trauma. Discussions will be based on a mixture of lectures, systematic group review of traumatic phenomena, and selected readings. The intent of these sessions will be to consider the nature of current trauma-focused treatments in a broader psychodynamic
context as well as implications of the phenomena of trauma to general psychotherapeutic practice.

Audience: Mental health professionals and trainees

Course Description: Participants will learn about what Freud described as the “traumatic situation” in the context of a psychoanalytic consideration of unfolding development and symptom formation. Participants will learn about the detailed phenomenology of traumatic experience and the convergence of psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral approaches to traumafocused treatments. Participants will learn about ways in which a deep understanding of the human experience of overwhelming, traumatic events can have broad implications for considering the goals of treatment in general psychotherapeutic practice. Selected readings from: Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety (Freud, 1926), Mourning and Melancholia (Freud, 1917) and Listening to Fear (Marans, 2005).

4 sessions
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:00 pm

January 12, 19, 26
February 2, 2011

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $180

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Philosophical Problems in Psychoanalysis (To be held 2011-2012)

 

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $270

 



Instructor: Marshal Mandelkern, MD, PhD

Educational Objectives: To examine several philosophical problems raised by psychoanalytic theory and practice.

Audience: Practitioners of analytic therapy with an interest in philosophical questions, and those with an interest in psychoanalytic theory.

Course Description: We will look at several philosophical questions raised by psychoanalytic theory and practice. The scientific basis of analysis, and the possibility of the hermeneutic alternative; the problem of free will in analysis; and the problem of consciousness. My main goal will be to highlight the problematic nature of these issues, rather than to come to any specific conclusion.

Will be held in academic year 2011-2012

 

 

 

 


 

 

Writing from Inside-Out

Instructor: Joan Wexler, MSW

Educational Objectives:

• To use reading as a stimulant to writing.
• To become more familiar with your own personal writing style.
• To capture internal experience in written prose.

Audience: Mental health professionals and trainees

Course Description: Reading clinical papers along with fiction, poetry and memoir enhances our own capacity to write about our patient’s internal lives and our responses to them. Each week we will read a poem, short story or short memoir and one clinical paper. Class members write a response to the reading of no more than 500 words. The writing response may be clinical, critical or personal. Discussion will focus on what works in the writing and reading samples—what aspect of the writing conveys the inner experience of the writer and the writer’s subject noting economy, clarity, point of view, affect and style.

6 sessions
Thursdays, 5:30–7 pm
March 24, 31
April 7, 14, 21, 28, 2011

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $270

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Introduction to the Work of Anna Freud

Instructors: Norka T. Malberg, PsyD and Victoria Morrow, M.D.

Educational Objectives: To acquaint ourselves with the work of child psychoanalyst Anna Freud, her theoretical conceptualizations and their clinical applications.

Audience: Mental health professionals and trainees, especially those working with children.

Course Description: This course will introduce the participants to the work of Anna Freud. Starting with a brief introduction to her life and work in order to provide a historical framework (e.g. the impact of the controversial discussions with Melanie Klein), the course will examine in
detail Anna Freud's major contributions such as the developmental profile and the
developmental lines and their applications to our work today. Examples of innovative
approaches to working with children away from the consulting room will be discussed.
The course will use clinical examples provided by instructors and participants to
illustrate major concepts and promote discussion regarding theoretical evolution
as well as to provide an opportunity for skill development.

8 sessions
Tuesdays, 5:30-7:00 pm
March 29
April 5, 26
May 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 2011

255 Bradley Street, New Haven

Fee: $360